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Facts & Figures

Annual Reports

The annual North Carolina HIV/STD/Hepatitis Surveillance Report contains detailed case statistics and tables about syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis B and C for the last full 5-year period. It includes breakdowns of reports by sex, age group, and race/ethnicity for each year with accompanying disease incidence rates.

Most Recent Annual Report

Special Note: 2019 HIV, STD and Hepatitis B and C annual data are now available. This year the annual report is broken up by disease to make it easier to find the relevant maps and tables. Charts, figures, and data on various populations are available as Fact Sheets and Slide Sets; some 2019 data is now available in these formats. Fact sheets and slide sets are updated over the course of the year.

2019 Annual Report

Key Points from the North Carolina 2019 Annual Report:

  • HIV

    • In 2019, 1,383 new HIV diagnoses were reported among the adult and adolescent (over 13 years old) population, a rate of 15.6 per 100,000 population. This rate is a slight increase from 2018, where 1,201 adults and adolescents were newly diagnosed with HIV (rate =13.7 per 100,000).
    • There was two perinatal (mother-to-child) HIV transmission documented in 2019.
    • People from 20 to 29 years old had the highest rate of newly diagnosed HIV in 2019 (41.5 per 100,000) and comprised 43% (N=594) of the newly diagnosed population.
    • For adults and adolescents newly diagnosed with HIV in 2019, the most likely route of transmission was male-male sex in 55.7% of all cases, heterosexual sex in 12.6% of cases, injection drug use (IDU) in 3.3% of cases, and combined male-male sex and injection drug use in 2.6% of cases; the most likely route of transmission was unknown for 25.9% of new HIV diagnoses in 2019.
  • Chlamydia

    • The number of chlamydia cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2019 was 71,296, a rate of 679.8 per 100,000 population, an increase from 66,716 cases in 2018 (rate of 642.6 per 100,000 population).
    • Chlamydia diagnoses increased by 20% from 39,798 in 2015 to 47,795 in 2019; Among men, chlamydia diagnoses increased 61% from 14,590 in 2015 to 23,501 in 2019; this may in part be due to increased screening among men.
  • Gonorrhea

    • The reported number of gonorrhea cases in 2019 was 26,643, a rate of 254.0 per 100,000 population, an increase from 23,538 cases in 2018 (rate of 226.7 per 100,000). Gonorrhea cases have been increasing in North Carolina for the past few years. In 2015, there were a total of 17,051 cases reported (170.0 per 100,000).
    • Among women, gonorrhea diagnoses increased 47% from 8,576 in 2015 to 12,617 in 2019; Among men, gonorrhea diagnoses increased 66% from 8,475 in 2015 to 14,026 in 2019; this may in part be due to increased screening among men. Men also increased from 49% to 53% of the total population diagnosed with gonorrhea during this time; this may in part be due to increased screening among men.
  • Syphilis

    • The number of early syphilis (primary, secondary, and early non-primary non-secondary) cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2019 was 2,117, a rate of 20.2 per 100,000 population. This is a slight increase from previous years (2017: 1,911 cases and rate of 18.6 per 100,000; 2018: 1,910 cases and rate of 18.4 per 100,000).
      • There were 27 infants reported with congenital syphilis in 2019. This number is an important increase from the 19 probable congenital syphilis cases reported in 2018.
  • Hepatitis B

    • The number of people diagnosed with acute hepatitis B in North Carolina in 2019 was 185, a rate of 1.8 per 100,000 population, a decrease from 227 cases in 2017 (2.1 per 100,000 population).
    • As of December 31, 2019, 25,463 people had been diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B in North Carolina.
  • Hepatitis C

    • The number of people diagnosed with acute hepatitis C in North Carolina in 2019 was 184, a rate of 1.8 per 100,000 population, which is slightly lower to the 197 cases diagnosed and reported in 2018 (1.9 per 100,000 population).
    • As of December 31, 2019, there have been 62,831 cases of chronic hepatitis C reported to North Carolina since 2016.

Previous Annual Reports (Last Four Years*)

*See Archives for earlier versions of the Annual Reports.

 

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