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Facts & Figures

Annual Reports

The annual North Carolina HIV/STD/Hepatitis Surveillance Report contains detailed case statistics and tables about syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis B and C for the last full 5-year period. It includes breakdowns of reports by sex, age group, and race/ethnicity for each year with accompanying disease incidence rates.

Most Recent Annual Reports

Special Note: 2020 HIV, STD and Hepatitis B and C annual data are now available. This year the annual report is broken up by disease to make it easier to find the relevant maps and tables. Charts, figures, and data on various populations are available as fact sheets and slide sets; some 2020 data is now available in these formats. Fact sheets and slide sets are updated over the course of the year.

2021 Annual Reports

Key Points from the North Carolina 2020 Annual Reports

HIV

  • As of December 31, 2020, the number of people living with HIV who reside in North Carolina (including those initially diagnosed in another state) was 34,963.
  • In 2020, 1,079 new HIV diagnoses were reported among the adult and adolescent (over 13 years old) population, a rate of 12.0 per 100,000 population.
  • The highest rate (55.0 per 100,000) of newly diagnosed HIV infection was among adult/adolescent Black/African American men.
  • For adults and adolescents newly diagnosed with HIV in 2020, the most likely route of transmission was male-male sex (reported by 56.3%), followed by heterosexual sex (17.3%), injection drug use (IDU) (3.3%), and combined male-male sex and injection drug use (3.1% of cases); the most likely route of transmission was unknown for 20.0% of people newly diagnosed with HIV in 2020.
  • The North Carolina rate of new Stage 3 (AIDS) diagnoses have been stable for the past five years.
  • There were no perinatal (mother-to-child) HIV transmissions documented in 2020.

STD

  • The number of chlamydia cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2020 was 64,342, a rate of 607.0 per 100,000 population.
  • In 2020, Black/African American men and women had the highest chlamydia rates (625.9 and 1,045.5 per 100,000, respectively) and accounted for 30.9% of people diagnosed with chlamydia.
  • The reported number of gonorrhea cases in 2020 was 28,014, a rate of 264.3 per 100,000 population, an increase from 26,705 cases in 2019 (rate of 254.3 per 100,000). Gonorrhea cases have been increasing in North Carolina for the past few years. In 2016, there were a total of 19,597 cases reported (192.8 per 100,000).
  • In 2020, Black/African American men and women had the highest gonorrhea rates (636.1 and 424.9 per 100,000, respectively) and accounted for 43.8% of people diagnosed with gonorrhea.
  • The number of early syphilis (primary, secondary, and early non-primary non-secondary) cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2020 was 2,342, a rate of 22.1 per 100,000 population. This is a slight increase from previous years (2018: 1,905 cases and rate of 18.3 per 100,000; 2019: 2,113 cases and rate of 20.1 per 100,000).
  • Black/African American men had the highest rates of early syphilis (103.5 per 100,000) and accounted for 48.4% of total early syphilis cases in 2020.

Hepatitis B and C

  • The number of people diagnosed with acute hepatitis B in North Carolina in 2020 was 131, a rate of 1.2 per 100,000 population. This is higher than the national average rate of acute hepatitis B, at 1.0 per 100,000 (based on the 2019 CDC hepatitis surveillance report https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics/2019surveillance/HepB.htm).
  • The highest rates of acute hepatitis B occurred among the 30- to 54-year-old age group. This age group comprised 84% of the total reported acute hepatitis B cases.
  • In 2020, White/Caucasian men and women had the highest acute hepatitis B rates (2.0 and 1.1 per 100,000, respectively) and comprised 79% of the total reported acute hepatitis B cases.
  • In 2020, the exposure most frequently reported by people with acute hepatitis B was heterosexual contact (42%), followed by injection drug use (IDU) (31%). Exposure is based on self-reported data.
  • The number of people diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B in North Carolina in 2020 was 768 (7.2 per 100,000). The majority of cases were among men (rate of 9.2 per 100,000), the 40-44 age group (rate of 14.4 per 100,000), and Asians/Pacific Islanders (rate of 38.8 per 100,000). Risk was not reported for over 60% of cases.
  • The number of people diagnosed with acute hepatitis C in North Carolina in 2020 was 100, a rate of 0.9 per 100,000 population. The national average rate of acute hepatitis C was 1.3 per 100,000 (based on 2019 CDC hepatitis surveillance report https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics/2019surveillance/HepC.htm).
  • The highest rates of acute hepatitis C occurred among the 25- to 39-year-old age group. This age group comprised 70% of the total reported acute hepatitis C cases.
  • In 2020, American Indian/Alaska Native men had the highest acute hepatitis C rates (1.6 per 100,000), but only made up 2% of the reported acute hepatitis C cases. The majority of cases (89%) were White/Caucasian men and women, with rates of 1.5 and 1.2 per 100,000, respectively.
  • In 2020, the most frequently reported risk factor by people with acute hepatitis C was IDU (54%), followed by sexual contact (12%). Exposure is based on self-reported data.
  • In 2020, 12,313 chronic hepatitis C cases were reported to the state. The majority of cases were among men (61%). The age groups 25-34 (24%) and 50-65 and older (37%) had the highest proportion of people with chronic hepatitis C. For the majority of cases, race/ethnicity is unknown (63%). Risk information is not collected for chronic hepatitis C cases at this time.

Previous Annual Reports (Last Four Years*)

*See Archives for earlier versions of the Annual Reports.

 

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